The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Fall 2022

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.
Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Thurs, Aug 18
Lewis 101
Hartmut Grote
Gravity Exploration Institute
Cardiff University
Quantum-Enhanced Interferometry for Dark Matter and Quantum Gravity Searches
Tue, Aug 23
Lewis 101
Department Faculty
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Ice Cream Social
Tue, Aug 30
Lewis 101
Quinn Campagna, Joe Rivest, Madusanka Abeykoon
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Student research presentations
Tue, Sep 6
Lewis 101
Sina Rostami, Santosh Bhandari, Devesh Bhattarai
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Student research presentations
Tue, Sep 13
Lewis 101
Cecille Labuda
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Spatial variation of the ultrasonic properties of brain
Tue, Sep 20
Lewis 101
Jeffrey Kleykamp and Luiz Prais
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Search for Non-Standard Interactions with Neutrino Oscillations at the NOvA Experiment
Tue, Sep 27
Lewis 101
Sadia Kaliil
Senior Data Scientist
Caterpillar Inc.
 
Tue, Oct 4
Lewis 101
Michaell Schatz
School of Physics and Center for Nonlinear Science
Georgia Institute of Technology
Forecasting Turbulence
Tue, Oct 11
Lewis 101
Woodrow Shew
Department of Physics
University of Arkansas
 
Tue, Oct 18
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Oct 25
Lewis 101
Scott Hertel
Department of Physics
University of Massachusetts Amherst
 
Tue, Nov 1
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 8
Lewis 101
Jan Strube
Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
 
Tue, Nov 15
Lewis 101
John Wise
Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics
Georgia Institute of Technology
The First Stars, Black Holes, and Galaxies in the Universe
Tue, Nov 29
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Dec 6
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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Abstracts of Talks

Hartmut Grote
Gravity Exploration Institute
Cardiff University

Quantum-Enhanced Interferometry for Dark Matter and Quantum Gravity Searches

Laser interferometry has revolutionized astronomy by introducing a new sense in the observation of the universe. We can now hear the ripples of space-time: gravitational waves. Moving beyond this 'application' of laser interferometry, in this talk I will give an overview of how ultra-precise laser interferometers can also be used to try to shed light on other mysteries of the universe. Namely the search for dark matter and the question of whether space-time is quantized at the smallest level.

Ice Cream Social

Join us for an opportunity to meet the faculty and students of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, hear about ongoing research, social and outreach activities, and enjoy some ice cream!

Student research presentations

Graduate students in the Department of Physics and Astronomy will present brief reports on their ongoing research.

Cecille Labuda
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Spatial variation of the ultrasonic properties of brain

Brain is inhomogeneous due to its composition of different tissue types (gray and white matter), anatomical structures (e.g. thalamus and cerebellum), and cavities in the brain (ventricles). These inhomogeneities lead to spatial variations in the ultrasonic properties of the organ. However, reporting on the spatial variation of the ultrasonic properties is limited in the literature. The spatial variation of the speed of sound, frequency slope of attenuation, attenuation and backscatter in brain tissue are presented here as two-dimensional maps. Tissue specimens were 1-cm thick slices of fixed sheep brain prepared from the coronal, sagittal and transverse anatomic planes. Ultrasonic measurements were performed using broadband transducers with center frequencies of 3.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10 MHz. The spatial variation of these properties are clearly visualized and structures visible in the maps are consistent with the known morphologic features of the brain. White and gray matter appeared to be distinguishable in the images. The average values of the ultrasonic properties are consistent with published values.

Jeffrey Kleykamp and Luiz Prais
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Search for Non-Standard Interactions with Neutrino Oscillations at the NOvA Experiment

The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations provided the first evidence for the so-called Physics Beyond the Standard Model, and opened a window for several and interesting new investigations in the field of neutrino physics. Among the possibilities, Non-standard interactions (NSI) are an extension of the neutrino matter effect leading to a rich phenomenology, and are expected to modify the propagation of neutrinos through matter. The current open questions in the neutrino oscillation model rely heavily on how neutrinos interact with matter, to an extent that NSI could induce possible effects. The NOvA Experiment presents its first preliminary search for flavor-changing NSI in neutrino oscillations in the 810 km baseline as neutrinos cross the Earth's crust between the Near and Far Detectors.

John Wise
Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics
Georgia Institute of Technology

The First Stars, Black Holes, and Galaxies in the Universe

Cosmic structure forms hierarchically through smooth accretion and dark matter halo mergers. As a consequence, all galaxies are the product of the dozens of mergers over billions of years. However, one can ask, ``What were the first stars and galaxies in the universe?'' I will review the current state-of-the-art simulations of early galaxy formation, starting with the formation of the first stars, which are initially devoid of metals and are suggested to have a characteristic mass of tens of solar masses. I will present results from a suite of cosmological radiation hydrodynamics simulations that focus on the transition from the first stars to the first galaxies. Each simulation captures the radiative and chemical feedback from 10,000 first stars, leading to the formation of a 107 solar mass galaxy only 500 million years after the Big Bang, that can now be tested against the latest observations from JWST. Last I will highlight how some of the earliest massive black holes form during these early epochs that could be the seeds of supermassive black holes that exist at the centers of all massive galaxies today.