The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Fall 2015

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 pm
with refreshments served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Aug 25
Lewis 101
  Ice Cream Social (PDF)
Tue, Sep 1
Lewis 101
Don Summers et al.
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Fascinating Physics Demonstrations
Tue, Sep 8
Lewis 101
Keola Wierschem
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Numerical Studies of Low-dimensional Quantum Magnetism
Tue, Sep 15
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Sep 22
Lewis 101
David Tsang
Department of Physics
McGill University
Gravity
Tue, Sep 29
Lewis 101
Shaoqi Hou
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of Alabama — Tuscaloosa
TeV scale Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider
Tue, Oct 6
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Oct 13
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Oct 20
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Oct 27
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 3
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 10
Lewis 101
Hartmut Grote
GEO600 Dept. — Laser Interferometry and Gravitational Wave Astronomy
LIGO Laboratory and Albert Einstein Institute — Hannover
No signal yet: The elusive birefringence of the vacuum, and whether gravitational wave detectors may help
Tue, Nov 17
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 24
Lewis 101
Thomas Turkey
Department of Nutrition
Virginia Tech
Continuing Advantages of a Vegetarian Diet
Tue, Dec 1
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Dec 08
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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Abstracts of Talks


Don Summers et al.
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Fascinating Physics Demonstrations

Fifty minutes of fascinating physics demonstrations, including milk jug rockets, will be presented.


Keola Wierschem
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Numerical Studies of Low-dimensional Quantum Magnetism

The increased role of fluctuations in low-dimensional systems can lead to surprising effects, such as the lack of thermal phase transitions in one dimension. This is especially true of spin-S Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chains: for S an integer, the ground state has exponentially decaying spin correlations and a gap to all excitations (the so-called Haldane gap). This is in stark contrast to the algebraic decay of spin correlations and gapless excitations above the ground state when S is one-half of an odd integer. The discovery of several Haldane gap materials over the last 28 years has reinforced our understanding of low dimensional quantum systems. In this talk, I present results from numerical studies of a spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model consisting of weakly coupled chains. Importantly, the Haldane phase survives up to a finite value of the interchain coupling strength, and this model captures the low temperature properties of the Haldane gap materials. I conclude by re-examining the nature of the Haldane phase in light of recent advances in the classification of quantum phases of matter.


Shaoqi Hou
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of Alabama — Tuscaloosa

TeV scale Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

If large extra dimensions exist, the Planck scale may be as low as a TeV and microscopic black holes may be produced in high-energy particle collisions at this energy scale. We simulate microscopic black hole formation at the Large Hadron Collider and compare the simulation results with recent experimental data by the Compact Muon Solenoid collaboration. The absence of observed black hole events in the experimental data allows us to set lower bounds on the Planck scale and various parameters related to microscopic black hole formation for a number (3-6) of extra dimensions. Our analysis sets lower bounds on the fundamental Planck scale and the minimal masses at black hole formation. In this talk, I will introduce the physics of TeV scale black holes and present analysis results.