The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Fall 2014

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 pm
with refreshments served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Aug 26
Lewis 101
  Ice Cream Social (PDF)
Tue, Sep 2
Lewis 101
Kevin Beach, Josh Gladden and Breese Quinn
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Research Overview
Gladden (PDF), Quinn (148 MB PowerPoint)
Tue, Sep 9
Lewis 101
No Colloquium
 
 
(Graduate Student Comprehensive Examinations)
Tue, Sep 16
Lewis 101
Alakabha Datta, Rob Kroeger, Joel Mobley
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Research Overview
Datta (PDF),
Tue, Sep 23
Lewis 101
Shivaraj Kandhasamy
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Searches for Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background in LIGO Data (PDF)
Tue, Sep 30
Lewis 101
Theresa Levitt
Department of History
University of Mississippi
Confronting the Big Questions from Both Sides of the Podium (PDF)
Tue, Oct 7
Lewis 101
No Colloquium
 
 
(extended faculty meeting)
Tue, Oct 14
Lewis 101
Sergei Kopeikin
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Missouri
 
Tue, Oct 21
Lewis 101
Mustapha Ishak
Department of Physics
University of Texas — Dallas
 
Tue, Oct 28
Lewis 101
Brad Ambrose
Department of Physics
Grand Valley State University
 
Tue, Nov 4
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 11
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 18
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 25
Lewis 101
Thomas Turkey
Department of Nutrition
Virginia Tech
Continuing Advantages of a Vegetarian Diet
Tue, Dec 2
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Dec 9
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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The physics colloquium organizer is Luca Bombelli
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Latest update: Wednesday, 01-Oct-2014 14:09:54 CDT

Past semesters: 

Abstracts of Talks


Shivaraj Kandhasamy
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Searches for Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background in LIGO Data

Incoherent superposition of gravitational waves (GWs) from a large number of unresolved sources is expected to give rise to a stochastic background of GWs. This stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) is one of the four types of GW signals LIGO is looking for. The SGWB could be either of astrophysical origin, produced by a large number of compact objects such as neutron stars, black holes etc., or of cosmological origin, produced in the early universe by events such as inflation. Detection of the stochastic gravitational wave background could provide information both about the state of the universe at its earliest moments and its evolution at later times. In this talk, I will discuss the results from searches for SGWB in LIGO data as well as results from a few other experiments.


Theresa Levitt
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Confronting the Big Questions from Both Sides of the Podium

The questions of cosmology are so large and profound that they seem to rightfully be the concern of all of humankind. Yet the subjects are often particularly intimidating ones for non-scientists. I recently took a Massively-Open Online Course (mooc) with astrophysicist Adam Frank, who made a point of trying to bridge this divide. The course surprised me both because of how much has changed in the field of cosmology since I took a class in it as an undergraduate, and also because of Frank's willingness to engage questions that had seemed “off-limits” in most physics classes, such as “where did the universe come from?” and “is there any other intelligent life?” I wanted to discuss some of his successful techniques, as well as my own (remarkably less successful) attempts to teach these ideas to freshman as part of the Honors 102 curriculum.