The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Spring 2015

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM
with refreshments served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Jan 20
Lewis 101
 
 
 
Ice Cream Social (PDF)
Tue, Jan 27
Lewis 101
Edward Thomas, Jr.
Physics Department
Auburn University
The Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) — First Results
Tue, Feb 3
Lewis 101
Philip W. Phillips
Department of Physics
University of Illinois
Unparticles in Strongly Correlated Electron Matter
Tue, Feb 10
Lewis 101
Michael Strauss
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Oklahoma
Measurements of the Properties of a Higgs Boson Using the ATLAS Detector at the LHC (PDF)
Tue, Feb 17
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Feb 24
Lewis 101
Antony Valentini
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Clemson University
Quantum Mechanics and Large-scale Cosmic Anomalies
Tue, Mar 3
Lewis 101
Timothy S. Hamilton
Department of Natural Sciences
Shawnee State University
 
Tue, Mar 10
Lewis 101
Spring Break  
Tue, Mar 17
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Mar 24
Lewis 101
Firouzeh Sabri
Department of Physics
University of Memphis
 
Tue, Mar 31
Lewis 101
 

 
 
Tue, Apr 7
Lewis 101
Atsushi Nishizawa
Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy
California Institute of Technology
 
Tue, Apr 14
Lewis 101
Jason Raymond
Biomedical Engineering
University of Cincinnati
 
Tue, Apr 21
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 28
Lewis 101
Mette Gaarde
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Louisiana State University
 
Tue, May 5
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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Abstracts of Talks


Edward Thomas, Jr.
Physics Department
Auburn University

The Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) — First Results

A dusty (or complex) plasma is a four-component plasma system consisting of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and charged, nanometer to micrometer sized particles (i.e., the "dust"). Because these dust grains are charged, they fully participate in the plasma dynamics and can be used to reveal details about transport, instabilities, and charging properties of plasmas. However, one important area that has not been studied extensively is the area of magnetized dusty plasmas. Even though the charged dust grains in a typical laboratory experiment can acquire several thousand elementary charges, the large mass of the grains ensures that the charge-to-mass ratio is quite low. As a result, it is technically challenging to design an experiment that can achieve full magnetization of ions, electrons, and the charged dust grains. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of magnetized dusty plasma experiments and highlight initial results from the MDPX facility.


Philip W. Phillips
Department of Physics
University of Illinois

Unparticles in Strongly Correlated Electron Matter

Solid state physicists are in love with electrons, in no small part because magnetism and conduction are explained by them in a wide class of materials. However, high-temperature superconductivity has resisted solution in terms of the standard paradigm as a result of the strong interactions. I begin this talk by asking a simple question: can all the charge density in the basic model for high-temperature superconductors be exhausted by counting all the electrons in the sample. I show that the answer is no. I propose instead that the unparticle construct of Howard Georgi's makes up the difference. Unparticle stuff is scale invariant matter that should be thought of as having all possible mass. I will show how a gravity construction can be used to model unparticles. I will close by demonstrating that the superconducting instability of unparticles is quite unconventional and likely to be operative in high-temperature superconductors.


Michael Strauss
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Oklahoma

Measurements of the Properties of a Higgs Boson Using the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

In July 2012 the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the CERN Large Hadron collider announced the discovery of a Boson consistent with the predicted standard model Higgs Boson. Since that discovery, further measurements have given insight into the properties of this particle. This talk will discuss the importance of the Higgs Boson within the standard model, the discovery of this new Boson, and subsequent measurements of its properties. Searches for additional Higgs Bosons may also be discussed.


Antony Valentini
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Clemson University

Quantum Mechanics and Large-scale Cosmic Anomalies

Recent observations by the Planck satellite point to the existence of large-scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We discuss how these might be explained in terms of the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics, according to which quantum fluctuations arise from a dynamical process of relaxation to equilibrium. An analysis of the de Broglie-Bohm dynamics on expanding space shows that relaxation is generally retarded for long-wavelength field modes. We may then expect a large-scale power deficit in the CMB, as appears to be observed. It is shown by numerical simulations that the deficit in the power spectrum (emerging from a pre-inflationary era) will have a characteristic shape, which we are currently searching for in the data. We also discuss how our scenario might explain the observed large-scale violations of statistical isotropy.