The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Spring 2018

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM
with refreshments served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Jan 23
Lewis 101
Jake Bennett
Department of Physics
Carnegie Mellon University
Amplitude Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Hadron Spectroscopy
Tue, Jan 30
Lewis 101
Brian Anderson
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Brigham Young University
Listening For Cracks Using Resonance And Time Reversal Techniques To Prevent Radiation Leakage From Nuclear Storage Containers
Thurs, Feb 8
Lewis 101
Aaron Zimmerman
Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics
University of Toronto
 
Thurs, Feb 15
Lewis 101
Jessica McIver
Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy
California Institute of Technology
 
Tue, Feb 20
Lewis 101
Dan Cherdack
Department of Physics
Colorado State University
 
Tue, Feb 27
Lewis 101
Tyrone Porter
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering
Boston University
 
Tue, Mar 6
Lewis 101
Harry Swinney
Center for Nonlinear Dynamics
University of Texas — Austin
 
Tue, Mar 13
Lewis 101
Spring Break
 
 
 
Tue, Mar 20
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Mar 27
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 3
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 10
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 17
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 24
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, May 1
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, May 8
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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The physics colloquium organizer is Likun Zhang
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Latest update: Sunday, 21-Jan-2018 17:46:50 CST

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Abstracts of Talks


Jake Bennett
Department of Physics
Carnegie Mellon University

Amplitude Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Hadron Spectroscopy

Extracting useful information from experimental data is often far from straightforward. This is particularly true for studies in hadron spectroscopy that seek to determine the properties of constituent quark states. The presence of multiple, often broad, states leads to potentially intricate interference patterns that make the extraction of meaningful information challenging. Amplitude analysis is a powerful tool to disentangle the effects of interference and extract useful properties of hadronic states. This information is vital for a deeper understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. In this talk, I will review the experimental challenges that are associated with amplitude analysis, as well as its potential as a tool for hadron spectroscopy at Belle II.


Brian Anderson
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Brigham Young University

Listening For Cracks Using Resonance And Time Reversal Techniques To Prevent Radiation Leakage From Nuclear Storage Containers

Spent nuclear fuel is often stored in stainless steel canisters in the United States. Stainless steel is susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). This presentation will discuss progress on the use of the Time Reversed Elastic Nonlinearity Diagnostic (TREND) and Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) to determine whether SCC is present and attempt to quantify the depth of the cracking. NRUS is the measurement of the amplitude dependence of a sample's resonance frequency, which occurs because of a softening of the elastic modulus in damaged media. NRUS provides a global indication of damage in a sample. TREND employs time reversal acoustics, which focuses wave energy at various points of interest to excite localized high amplitude. The amplitude dependence of this localized energy allows pointwise inspection of a sample.