The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Spring 2016

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM
with refreshments served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Jan 26
Lewis 101
Don Summers
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Supernova 1987A: Death of a Star
Tue, Feb 2
Lewis 101
Don Summers
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Voyager: Mission to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune
Tue, Feb 9
Lewis 101
Racha Chouiab
Department of Physics
McGill University
Search for Rare B Meson Decays at the BaBar Experiment
Tue, Feb 16
Lewis 101
Marco Cavaglà &Katherine Dooley
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
LIGO Research
Tue, Feb 23
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Mar 1
Lewis 101
Hajime Sotani
Division of Theoretical Astronomy
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan
Relativistic Stars
Tue, Mar 8
Lewis 101
Ahmed Rashed
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
 
Tue, Mar 15
Lewis 101
Spring Break
 
 
 
Tue, Mar 22
Lewis 101
Thomas Sotiriou
School of Physics & Astronomy
University of Nottingham
General Relativity
Tue, Mar 29
Lewis 101
Richard Brito
Gravitation in Técnico
Instituto Superior Técnico — CENTRA
Gravity
Tue, Apr 5
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 12
Lewis 101
Greg Dooley
Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Tidal Stripping with Self-Interacting Dark Matter
Tue, Apr 19
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 26
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, May 3
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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Abstracts of Talks


Don Summers
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Supernova 1987A: Death of a Star

A DVD account of the discovery of the first nearby supernova explosion in 500 years by University of Toronto graduate student Ian Shelton at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Supernovas allow the formation of terrestrial planets by ejecting heavy elements into interstellar space and provide a standard candle which astronomers use to measure distances to galaxies.


Don Summers
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Voyager: Mission to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

The Voyager 2 flyby spacecraft observed active sulphur volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io, photographed spokes in Saturn's rings, measured the magnetic field of Uranus, and saw liquid nitrogen geysers on Neptune's moon Triton.


Racha Chouiab
Department of Physics
McGill University

Search for Rare B Meson Decays at the BaBar Experiment

The current understanding of the basic constituents of matter in our universe is embedded in the Standard Model (SM). This model has succeeded as a low energy effective theory. Yet, even with its high level of consistency with experimental measurements, many questions are left unanswered. This motivates the ongiong hunt for new physics. In this talk, I present the search for rare B meson decays, specifically flavour-changing neutral current (FCNC) processes. FCNC processes, such as B → K(*)+ where = e, μ, τ or ν, are highly suppressed in the Standard Model (SM), with a branching fraction ranging between 10-5 and 10-7. These rare decays are forbidden at tree level and can only occur at lowest order via 1-loop diagrams. B → K(*)+ thus provides a stringent test of the SM and a fertile ground for new physics searches. The BaBar experiment at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has completed its data taking, with 424 fb-1 collected at the Υ(4S) resonance. Using data from the BaBar experiment, I present the latest results on the search for B → K(*)+, where = e, μ, τ or ν. Furthermore, the first search for B+ → K+τ+τ is presented, along with its current status and anticipated sensitivity.