The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Fall 2019

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM
with refreshments served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

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Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Aug 27
Lewis 101
4:30 PM
Department Faculty
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Ice Cream Social. (PDF)
Tue, Sep 3
Lewis 101
Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya
Department of Natural Sciences
Lawrence Technological University
CP Violation in the Precision Era
Tue, Sep 10
Lewis 101
No Colloquium
 
 
(Graduate Student Comprehensive Examinations)
Tue, Sep 17
Lewis 101
Keegan Kurpakus, HuuTran Do, Saeed Kamali, Raymond Siedlecki, and John Vincent Waite
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Reports on Summer Research
Tue, Sep 24
Lewis 101
Carl Jensen
Transducer Technology Group
Bose Corporation
Sound Reproduction and Loudspeaker Structural Modes
Tue, Oct 1
Lewis 101
Michel Villanueva
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Searches of New Physics with the Belle II Experiment
Tue, Oct 8
Lewis 101
Tomas Galvez
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Quantum Cosmology and Sound Waves in the Early Universe
Tue, Oct 15
Lewis 101
Lorena Magaña Zertuche, Sashwat Tanay, Akshay Vijaykumar Khadse, Sudeep (I) Adhikari, Jonathan Herlan, and Ashoka Karunarathne
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Reports on Summer Research
Tue, Oct 22
Lewis 101
David Craig
Department of Chemistry and Physics
West Texas A&M University
From Astronomy to Acoustics and Back Again Through Undergraduate Research
Tue, Oct 29
Lewis 101
Xudong Fan, Sudeep (II) Adhikari, Benjamin "B.B." Pilgrim, Kevin Yi-Wei Lin, He Liu, and Khagendra Adhikari
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Reports on Summer Research
Tue, Nov 5
Lewis 101
Logan S. Marcus
Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense
ANSER, Inc.
Careers in Science Outside of Academia
Links for Science Careers Outside of Academia (PDF)
Tue, Nov 12
Lewis 101
Annemarie Exarhos
Department of Physics
Lafayette College
A Path Toward Spin-Based Quantum Technologies: Creating, Controlling, and Characterizing Quantum Emission
Tue, Nov 19
Lewis 101
Dr. Stuart Loch
College of Sciences and Mathematics
Auburn University
Spectroscopy of Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas: Applications for Fusion Plasmas, Merging Neutron Stars, and Planetary Nebulae
Tue, Nov 26
Lewis 101
Thomas Turkey
Department of Nutrition
Virginia Tech
Continuing Advantages of a Vegetarian Diet
Tue, Dec 3
Lewis 101
Jake Bennett, Roger Waxler, and Gavin Davies
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Departmental Research
Jake Bennet: Belle II
Roger Waxler: Infrasound
Gavin Davies: NOνa/Dune
Tue, Dec 10
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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Abstracts of Talks


Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya
Department of Natural Sciences
Lawrence Technological University

CP Violation in the Precision Era

Anomalies in recent data present strong hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. Several new physics models, among them vector bosons and leptoquarks, have proven to be viable candidates in light of the data. Intensity frontier experiments will soon test many of these models through precision measurements of low-energy observables. In this talk I will present a subset of recent measurements that come with a hint of new physics. I will present proposals for testing and distinguishing between some of the popular new physics models, by using CP violating observables.


Carl Jensen
Transducer Technology Group
Bose Corporation

Sound Reproduction and Loudspeaker Structural Modes

Many familiar sources of sound involve vibrating structures like a piano sound board, an acoustic guitar's body, drums, and all kinds of vibrating machinery. Similarly, almost all technologies for mechanically producing sound also work by exciting some kind of vibrating structure as well, but, in sound reproduction, the goal is to recreate the original recording as accurately as possible. So the fact that all vibrating structures exhibit modal behavior can be good or bad: the diversity and excitation of modes in musical instruments lends them their unique sonic qualities and richness, but these same characteristics are very much unwanted in a loudspeaker meant for accurate reproduction. In this presentation, I'll discuss some of the principles of sound reproduction and perception as well as laying out how we can use computer simulations to untangle the complex acoustic behavior of these modes to understand their behavior and make better sounding loudspeakers.


Michel Villanueva
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Searches of New Physics with the Belle II Experiment

Despite the large success shown by the Standard Model of Elementary Particles describing subatomic processes, there are still many open questions in nature that cannot be explained by the Standard Model. Solving the issues faced by the Standard Model requires the introduction of new particles or interactions, which, if they exist, can be observed as deviations from the predictions of suppressed or forbidden processes. The Belle II experiment will play a critical role in searches for new physics at the "intensity frontier". First collisions took place in 2018 at the new SuperKEKB accelerator, which is expected to operate for the next decade, collecting 50 times more data than the previous generation of experiments of this kind. In this talk, the data production and physics programs of the Belle II experiment are presented, in which the High Energy Physics group of the University of Mississippi contributes to key roles. Of particular interest in my research are decays of the tau lepton, which provide a clean environment to the study of QCD related processes.


Tomas Galvez
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Quantum Cosmology and Sound Waves in the Early Universe

In this talk, we will review some of the conundrums of standard big bang cosmology and a few proposals designed to circumvent them. To do so, we study the quantum origin of perturbations in a perfect (or imperfect) fluid and show some useful techniques to calculate their corresponding two-point correlators. Our objective is to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the existing methods to evaluate primordial power spectra of scalar and tensor fluctuations, and therefore provide solid observational constraints. Our approach is to rewrite all the relevant equations of motion in terms of slowly varying quantities, which is important to consider the contribution from high-frequency modes to the spectrum without affecting computational performance. We do not require additional approximations to reproduce all the features in the power spectrum for each specific early universe model.


David Craig
Department of Chemistry and Physics
West Texas A&M University

From Astronomy to Acoustics and Back Again Through Undergraduate Research

After earning my PhD in physical acoustics at Ole Miss and a number of years at institutions almost exclusively devoted to teaching, I returned to active research by joining a team of astrophysicists working on projects that emphasize undergraduate research in observational cosmology. I will discuss the ways undergraduates have been involved in cutting-edge research via this team approach and overview the science behind the projects.

Our emphasis has been on HI (21 cm) radio surveys of nearby galaxies. These include the completed ALFALFA blind survey of the nearby universe, and the current targeted Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS) which attempts to detect dark matter-driven infall of galaxies onto a nearby supercluster filament. I will include a discussion of the observing strategies and the planned use of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation to separate the effects of cosmic expansion and local peculiar velocities using Bayesian statistical methods.


Logan S. Marcus
Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense
ANSER, Inc.

Careers in Science Outside of Academia

There is generational change in the way that scientists must approach their careers after graduating. According to Science Magazine, “…for U.S. science and engineering Ph.D.s, private sector employment (42%) is now nearly on par with educational institutions (43%).” Graduating students must be prepared to enter a job market that includes opportunities beyond traditional academic careers. In this presentation, I will discuss some of the many options for careers in science that are outside of the traditional academic path. I will explore example careers, offer advice to students on how to prepare themselves for those careers, and discuss skills that the University can emphasize to equip graduates before they leave Ole Miss.


Annemarie Exarhos
Department of Physics
Lafayette College

A Path Toward Spin-Based Quantum Technologies: Creating, Controlling, and Characterizing Quantum Emission

Optically-active point defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors are the basis for rapidly expanding quantum technologies in nanoscale sensing and quantum information processing. Most research has focused on three-dimensional host materials such as diamond and silicon carbide, where quantum mechanical spin states can be optically addressed. In recent years, the two-dimensional van der Waals material hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a robust host for bright, stable, room-temperature quantum emitters (QEs). However, many questions persist regarding the chemical and electronic structure of the defects responsible for emission as well as the potential role of spin-related effects. Significantly complicating the identification of these QEs is the heterogeneity of optical and magnetic characteristics observed.

I will discuss work regarding our studies of the optical and magnetic properties of QEs in hBN films, characterized via confocal fluorescence microscopy. In particular, I will report on our recent observations of magnetic-field dependent emission in some QEs that, if able to be well-isolated and controlled, could enable the realization of spin-based quantum technologies using low-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures.


Dr. Stuart Loch
College of Sciences and Mathematics
Auburn University

Spectroscopy of Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas: Applications for Fusion Plasmas, Merging Neutron Stars, and Planetary Nebulae

Plasmas are hot, ionized gases and are often called the fourth state of matter. Plasmas make up most of the observable Universe and laboratory plasmas have a wide range of research applications. Diagnosing the properties of plasmas presents a particular challenge, due to their temperatures and in the case of astrophysical plasmas, the large distances to the objects. Plasma spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method of diagnosing important plasma properties such as temperatures, densities, and elemental compositions. An overview is given of three research projects, involving the use of quantum mechanics calculations for diagnosis of laboratory plasmas. The projects involve measuring wall erosion rates from fusion plasma experiments, investigating the spectral emission from elements made in neutron star mergers, and the confirmation of a new atomic process found in planetary nebulae.