The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Fall 2024

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM, refreshments will be served 15 minutes before each colloquium.
Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Aug 27
Lewis 101
Department Social
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
Ice Cream Social
Tue, Sep 3
Lewis 101
Bhubhanjyoti Bhattacharya
Department of Natural Sciences
Lawrence Technological University
 
Tue, Sep 10
Lewis 101
Cecille Labuda
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
 
Tue, Sep 17
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Sep 24
Lewis 101
Sunghwan Jung
Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering
Cornell University
Physics in Drinking and Diving
Tue, Oct 1
Lewis 101
Bhupal Dev
Department of Physics
Washington University in Saint Louis
 
Tue, Oct 8
Lewis 101
James Bonifacio
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi
 
Tue, Oct 15
Lewis 101
Gil Paz
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Wayne State University
 
Tue, Oct 22
Lewis 101
Meghna Bhattacharya
Scientific Computing Division
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
 
Tue, Oct 29
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 5
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 12
Lewis 101
James Friend
Center for Medical Devices
University of California — San Diego
Acoustic Streaming
Tue, Nov 19
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Nov 26
Lewis 101
Thanksgiving Break  
Tue, Dec 3
Lewis 101
Hayley Macpherson
Department of Physics
University of Chicago
 
Tue, Dec 10
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

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The physics colloquium organizer is Alakabha Datta
This page is maintained by David Sanders
Latest update: Wednesday, 26-Jun-2024 18:12:24 CDT

Past semesters: 

Abstracts of Talks


James Friend
Center for Medical Devices
University of California — San Diego

Acoustic Streaming

The analysis and use of acoustic streaming has taken on new urgency in the past few years with the recognition that classical analysis methods are unable to accurately quantify the flows generated by passing acoustic waves beyond a few hundred kHz. This issue, known since at least Lighthill’s namesake publication in the 1970s, has not been addressed in the time since, with many researchers—including the author—resorting to computational analysis and approximations to overcome at least some of the problems. Moreover, few researchers have been willing to consider the dynamic behavior of acoustic streaming: the delayed onset, the response to inharmonic excitation, and the delayed flows after the acoustic wave ceases, though these aspects are important in many experiments. Much of the reason is the challenge of the analysis of such flows. After considerable work via an alternative analysis path, we may finally have arrived at a method for closed-form analysis of acoustic streaming at least in one dimension, with transient behavior and both nonlinear compressibility and viscous effects included. We present a coherent and straightforward plan for analyzing simple acoustic streaming cases where classic theories fall short.