The University of Mississippi
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Seminars/Colloquia, Spring 2018

Unless noted otherwise, Tuesday Colloquia are at 4:00 PM
with refreshments served 15 minutes before each colloquium.

Scheduling for additional seminars will vary.

Date/Place Speaker Title (and link to abstract)
Tue, Jan 23
Lewis 101
Jake Bennett
Department of Physics
Carnegie Mellon University
Amplitude Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Hadron Spectroscopy
Tue, Jan 30
Lewis 101
Brian Anderson
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Brigham Young University
Listening For Cracks Using Resonance And Time Reversal Techniques To Prevent Radiation Leakage From Nuclear Storage Containers
Thurs, Feb 8
NCPA Auditorium
Aaron Zimmerman
Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics
University of Toronto
Black Holes, Alone and in Pairs
Thurs, Feb 15
Lewis 101
Jessica McIver
Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy
California Institute of Technology
Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: A New Era of Discovery
Tue, Feb 20
Lewis 101
Dan Cherdack
Department of Physics
Colorado State University
Searching for CP-Violation with the DUNE Experiment
Tue, Feb 27
Lewis 101
Tony Jun Huang
Pratt School of Engineering
Duke University
Acoustofluidics: Merging Acoustics and Microfluidics for Biomedical Applications
Tue, Mar 6
Lewis 101
Harry Swinney
Center for Nonlinear Dynamics
University of Texas — Austin
Universality in Nature
Tue, Mar 13
Lewis 101
Spring Break
 
 
 
Tue, Mar 20
Lewis 101
Tyrone Porter
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering
Boston University
 
Tue, Mar 27
Lewis 101
David Meyer
Department of Mathematics
University of California — San Diego
 
Tue, Apr 3
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 10
Lewis 101
Bruno Uchoa
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Oklahoma
 
Tue, Apr 17
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, Apr 24
Lewis 101
Deidre Shoemaker
School of Physics
Georgia Institute of Technology
 
Tue, May 1
Lewis 101
 
 
 
 
Tue, May 8
Lewis 101
Final Exam Week  

This page has been viewed 34595 times.
The physics colloquium organizer is Likun Zhang
This page is maintained by David Sanders
Latest update: Friday, 23-Feb-2018 17:47:29 CST

Past semesters: 

Abstracts of Talks


Jake Bennett
Department of Physics
Carnegie Mellon University

Amplitude Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Hadron Spectroscopy

Extracting useful information from experimental data is often far from straightforward. This is particularly true for studies in hadron spectroscopy that seek to determine the properties of constituent quark states. The presence of multiple, often broad, states leads to potentially intricate interference patterns that make the extraction of meaningful information challenging. Amplitude analysis is a powerful tool to disentangle the effects of interference and extract useful properties of hadronic states. This information is vital for a deeper understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. In this talk, I will review the experimental challenges that are associated with amplitude analysis, as well as its potential as a tool for hadron spectroscopy at Belle II.


Brian Anderson
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Brigham Young University

Listening For Cracks Using Resonance And Time Reversal Techniques To Prevent Radiation Leakage From Nuclear Storage Containers

Spent nuclear fuel is often stored in stainless steel canisters in the United States. Stainless steel is susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). This presentation will discuss progress on the use of the Time Reversed Elastic Nonlinearity Diagnostic (TREND) and Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) to determine whether SCC is present and attempt to quantify the depth of the cracking. NRUS is the measurement of the amplitude dependence of a sample's resonance frequency, which occurs because of a softening of the elastic modulus in damaged media. NRUS provides a global indication of damage in a sample. TREND employs time reversal acoustics, which focuses wave energy at various points of interest to excite localized high amplitude. The amplitude dependence of this localized energy allows pointwise inspection of a sample.


Aaron Zimmerman
Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics
University of Toronto

Black Holes, Alone and in Pairs

The recent detections of gravitational waves have revealed an invisible side of the universe: black holes in binaries. These observations test our understanding of black holes, their violent mergers, and the theory of general relativity. A combination of analytic approximations and full numerical simulations is required to understand black hole binaries and predict the gravitational waves they emit. I will take us on a tour of these systems, discuss the “ringdown” of the final merged black hole, and present the most recent results from the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors.


Jessica McIver
Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy
California Institute of Technology

Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: A New Era of Discovery

Large-scale interferometric detectors including LIGO and Virgo sense gravitational waves; minuscule fluctuations in space-time from the most extreme phenomena in the Universe. The recent detection of gravitational waves by LIGO and Virgo in concert with an associated electromagnetic counterpart was a breakthrough in multi-messenger astronomy that confirmed the association between neutron star collisions and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and yielded new insight into the physical engine driving GRBs. Future gravitational wave observations have the potential to provide critical insight into key open questions in astrophysics, including the distribution of compact objects in the Universe, the evolution of compact binary systems, galaxy formation, and the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae.

I will present the major outstanding challenges in gravitational wave astrophysics, including searching for transient signals in noisy data that contains a high rate of transient noise artifacts. I will discuss future prospects for how this quickly growing field will shape our understanding of the Universe.


Dan Cherdack
Department of Physics
Colorado State University

Searching for CP-Violation with the DUNE Experiment

Of the four known fundamental forces the weak force has many unique properties. It is the only standard model force that couples to all known fermions, that has massive exchange bosons, and that induces particle flavor changes. Even more surprising is that the weak force maximally violates parity symmetry, and has even been demonstrated to break charge-parity (CP) symmetry, meaning the weak force interacts differently with matter and anti-matter. This last property may hold the key to understanding several fundamental mysteries of the universe from the three-generation structure of matter, to the missing link between the big bang and the observed universe.

Neutrinos only interact via the weak force which means they are hard to detect, but provide a unique test bed for studying the weak interaction. Over the past few decades it was discovered that neutrinos have mass and change flavors. Studying the way neutrinos change flavors, termed neutrino oscillations, allows us to search for a new source of CP-violation. The next-generation Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will usher in an era of high precision neutrino physics with the worlds most intense neutrino beam and high resolution Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPCs) detectors. The Fermilab Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) Program will employ three LAr TPCs, which will provide and excellent test bed for LAr TPC R&D, and allow for many important measurements crucial to DUNE. I will discuss the theoretical framework we use to describe neutrino oscillations, and the exciting opportunities and new challenges afforded us by these experiments.


Tony Jun Huang
Pratt School of Engineering
Duke University

Acoustofluidics: Merging Acoustics and Microfluidics for Biomedical Applications

The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in lab-on-a-chip research with applications in biology, chemistry, and medicine. The continuous fusion of novel properties of physics into microfluidic environments has enabled the rapid development of this field. Recently, a new lab-on-a-chip frontier has emerged, joining acoustics with microfluidics, termed acoustofluidics. Here we summarize our recent progress in this exciting field and show the depth and breadth of acoustofluidic tools for biomedical applications through many unique examples, from exosome separation to cell-cell communications to 3D bioprinting, from circulating tumor cell isolation and detection to ultra-high-throughput blood cell separation for therapeutics, from high-precision micro-flow cytometry to portable yet powerful fluid manipulation systems. These acoustofluidic technologies are capable of delivering high-precision, high-throughput, and high-efficiency cell/particle/fluid manipulation in a simple, inexpensive, cell-phone-sized device. More importantly, the acoustic power intensity and frequency used in these acoustofluidic devices are in a similar range as those used in ultrasonic imaging, which has proven to be extremely safe for health monitoring during various stages of pregnancy. As a result, these methods are extremely biocompatible; i.e., cells and other biospecimen can maintain their natural states without any adverse effects from the acoustic manipulation process. With these unique advantages, acoustofluidic technologies meet a crucial need for highly accurate and amenable disease diagnosis (e.g., early cancer detection and prenatal health) as well as effective therapy (e.g., transfusion and immunotherapy).


Harry Swinney
Center for Nonlinear Dynamics
University of Texas — Austin

Universality in Nature

In the seventeenth century Newton thought about the gravitational force between the earth and an apple falling from a tree, and he said “I began to think of gravity extending to the orb of the Moon.” This led him to postulate that his gravitational force law is a universal law of nature, applying to any two masses in the universe. We now know that there are three other fundamental universal forces in nature, the electromagnetic and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Systems of many atoms or molecules can similarly exhibit universal behavior. For example, studies of phase transitions in the 20th century culminated with Kenneth Wilson's theory of universality in phase transitions of systems as different as fluids and magnets. The present talk examines spatial patterns that emerge in systems driven away from thermodynamic equilibrium by imposed gradients in pressure, temperature, or nutrient concentration. Experiments and mathematical models provide insights into the formation of patterns in physical, chemical, and biological systems, as will be illustrated through examples that reveal mathematical similarity in phenomena such as in the fractal wrinkling of flower petals and plastic sheets.